Author Archives: missjaybar

Remote Asychronous TAB

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On Thursday, I will start my 14th year of teaching. It is a bag of mixed emotions. It is one of the hardest starts to a school year to date. And, it appears as it will be one of the most complicated. My district, as many other districts in central Texas, has decided to start the year off remotely. We will definitely teach the first 4 weeks this way. At week 2, the board will meet, go over the data, and decide if we will continue all remotely at week 5 or if we will go to the option of both remote and in-person. In my mind, I’m not there yet. I want to concentrate on getting remote up and running, then I will think about how do deal with 2 types of learning. I assume (and yes I now what happens when we assume…) that we will have some kind of guidance about equity with in-person and remote simultaneously.

Speaking of equity, my school has decided that we will be 100% asynchronous. Our goal is to meet ALL students, not just most like we did in the spring. Our community is one where not all have internet and some are out in the country where a hot spot won’t work. I know some students have to work during the day to help with household budgets and other students need to watch younger siblings and help with their work. I have been told that some businesses in the local community are setting up ways for students to come in and do their school work using the business’ wifi, keeping local covid mandates in mind. So, asynchronous really does seem to be best for the community.

Now that I have given a bit of info about my teaching situation, I thought I would speak to what I am going to do in my remote teaching and with trying to stay true to the 3 guiding principals of TAB–What do artists do? The child is the artist. The classroom is their studio. And in this case, where they are is their studio. I am also trying to stay true as much as I can to the TAB program I have built over the years.

It may not seem like remote is the best for building relationships/community with our classes as a whole group, but that doesn’t mean teachers can’t build one-on-one relationships with their students through our LMS, Google Classroom. I plan on using flipgrid to help learn more about my students. I will include my face in all my videos–I’ve learned to float my video recording of me speaking over my screen recording using quicktime. Or I will use a program I discovered called Loom, it also allows the computer camera to hover in front of a screen record. (It’s not perfect, but my students will get to see all the fabulous facial gestures and hand waving I do as I talk–and that is such a huge part of who I am, lol.) I also plan on utilizing an “autobiographical artwork” activity that Melissa Purtee so graciously shared. Lastly, in the spring I found in the that replying or leaving comments with on students submissions is really helpful in growing and keeping relationships and communication.

This year I have 7 classes–art 1, art 2, art 3, art 4, beginning, intermediate, and advanced ceramics. Every year, my students in art 1, art 2, and beginning ceramics create sketchbooks together at the beginning of the year. I think this helps my students that can’t afford sketchbooks, and students tend to have more ownership of the sketchbook because they made it. This is an activity I am continuing. I have spent many hours building sketchbook kits that students can come pick up from school. I think it will also be good for them to have something hands-on to do for remote school and to have a place to continue with learning to think like an artist. And, when we hopefully return, all that wonderful information and inspiration they added to their sketchbooks will be easily found and not all over in google classroom and drive folders.

Once we finish the sketchbooks, we will start learning about the ATP (Artistic Thinking Process). This is also something I do at the start of each year. This will also help me to learn more about the students and their interests. Like in person, each stage of the process will be looked at individually to help the students really stop to think about what they are doing, why they are doing it, and various way how to be inspired and develop ideas. When we get to the create stage, the students will be limited to their sketchbook and a pencil (and any supplies they have at home), but I think that is okay because artists often have limitations. I plan on making clay kits for my intermediate and advanced students, so they can create small ceramic pieces at home. (I can write more about how my ceramic classes will work in another post at some point.)

I know this post isn’t covering everything I will be doing with all my classes. My art 3 and art 4 (which are stacked) will be doing a book study of “Steal Like an Artist” with lots of activities on how to get their ideas flowing (hopefully). I am excited about that. I was given a grant for a class set of the book. I love the book, and I think as the students in those 2 classes are trying to start finding their voices and their influences, the book study will be a good thing. Also, it gives them time away from the screen. I figured I would wait until after the book study to blog about it.

I know there are many more things I will have to deal with as the year goes on. I have “how to deal with in-person and social distancing and no sharing” in the back of my mind at all times. But, for now, I am comfortable in how I am translating my in-person TAB classes into virtual TAB classes. I feel that even though there may be limitations in materials and the sizes of artworks, I can still help my students to learn to think and behave like artists, and, as usual, I keep that at the forefront of my mind as I plan.

Corona and Remote Teaching

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I see it has been over 2 months since my last post. And, quite frankly, I’m not surprised. I had some ideas in the works for new posts on the exciting stuff and things happening in the Duck Art Room since January, but then Corona hit, and my spirits plummeted.

I tried with all I had in me to look the “new normal” in the eye and take it on. And by new normal, I mean remote teaching or distance learning or “homeschooling” 🙄🙄🙄. (Don’t get me started on how none of this is homeschooling. I know people that homeschool for a living, and this is not it folks. But I digress.) It was hard. I wanted to be the best teacher I could be, but in truth, I wanted to just paint and drink coffee and play with clay. And I’ve done all that. In fact, by the end of this, I will have a full kiln load of just stuff I made.

One week away from school turned to two weeks; then to three weeks. And now, I’m pretty sure we won’t be back this school year. And at this point, while I want to see all my kids more than anything, I don’t know how we could make the switch one more time with 7 weeks (in my district anyway) of school left — 3 of which we are definitely out for Shelter-In-Place orders.

My district has been remote teaching/distance learning for 3 weeks now. I feel it has all been one big trial and error session. My district finally came to a decision about grading and GPA and class rank–which for those of you who teach high school know that these things are currently important in the world of education and higher education. I won’t go into everything, but we are going to a pass/fail system for the second marking period of the 2019-20 school year. Grades will be assigned with “prominent emphasis on completion and effort”. So, that sounds good right. It sounds as about as equitable as they can get. We are trying very hard to make sure we can meet accommodations and reach students without internet and give grace to those struggling with home issues (siblings, work, etc.) that affect them being able to do school work. Could more be done? Probably. But I know we are trying.

What does this all have to do with Art and Teaching for Artistic Behavior and Duck Art? A lot actually. I said that my spirits had plummeted, and that included my spirit for facilitating meaningful art making situations for my students. Instead, I assigned what I felt was going to be the easiest thing for me to do. Currently, I have about 50-65% participation from my students–some do all of it, most pick and choose and turn in a thing here or a thing there. It made me sad to say the least. I was missing seeing my kids make and create and all those other things that go with being artists.

Earlier this week, I was looking at Facebook, like all who are at home do, and I finally clicked on my friend Melissa Purtee’s post about what she was doing remotely with her kids, and it sparked something in me. I was then reminded of a post another friend had put in the main TAB Facebook group about not forgetting our purpose as TAB teachers–those 3 main tenets of the philosophy. I knew I had to change what I was doing. I couldn’t sustain it anyway. So, I borrowed from Melissa, as she so graciously lets us do, and made a new website for my students–all of my students, no matter the level or the class type. It gives them choice. It lets them decided how to spend their time during the week–instead of a daily assignment, they know what they need to do for the week on Monday and can plan their schedule to meet their needs. It makes them think and decide and research and plan and all those behaviors we have been talking and learning about for months or years. I have full belief in my students and I am hoping that it is what is right for them, and for their situations. I hope they can see art making not as a thing they have to do, but they want to do–because the freedom is in their hands now.

I’ll leave you with this. I’m not sure how I feel about our “New Normal”. I just hope I am bringing a sense of comfort to my students thru art and choice as we navigate this together.

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Restoration of a Practice

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As we enter the third week of the new semester, I thought I would update on my “restoration” of the school year. (Confused? See this post for some clarity.) I know it has been a short time, but I am starting to really feel like I am getting a hold of the school year. Maybe I should say it’s been a long time. I mean, it is January, and we’ve been in school for about 4 months already.

img_20200123_183235_2816965594421370195777.jpg       img_20200122_110002_4556652781830567087963.jpgI came into this semester in a different frame of mind. I realized in December that I needed to change what was happening in my art studio, what was happening with my students. I felt they weren’t getting the best out of our TAB studio. And, I knew it wasn’t really them, but it was me. I was doing what felt right last school year…what worked for last year’s students. I was doing what I thought I should be doing. I wasn’t really seeing what my kids were missing.

So, over winter break I sat down with notebooks and made lots of notes. I figured out what my students were needing, and got to planning.

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We started off with an exploration of the human face. It was very teacher-led, but it was a good way to start off the new semester. It got them engaged because teens love drawing eyes and lips. It helped to build their skills, and it was a nice ease back into art after 2+ weeks of sitting around.

But, it was what I decided to do after that I think is really making the difference. In art 1, we had been working through “The 9”, packets designed by Ian Sands that offer a lot of choice, but on a more basic, general subject matter (landscape, nature, architecture, etc.) These have been helpful, but I felt my art 1 students

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needed more. At one point in my TAB journey, we worked with themes. I felt it was time to incorporate themes again. What I ultimately decided was that students would have a choice of a new packet (this time portraits due to the exploration we did), any previous packet we have visited this year, and a theme. And, so far, so good. Students are much more engaged with the larger choice, and because everyone isn’t doing the same packet, there is much more delving into the ATP (Artistic Thinking Process). Also, the required student-teacher meeting between development and creation has really helped them as well.

I20200116_1003544689872620955959336.jpg am finally fully engaged this school year, and all it took was some deep reflection and a few tweaks to restore my passion for TAB and teaching.

This is 20 20.

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It’s a new year…like it started yesterday. And with the end of each old year, and the beginning of a new one, there always comes with it some reflection. Many people create goals or make resolutions for the new year. I like to choose a word that I keep with me throughout the year, having it on my mind as I make decisions and navigate life.

I recently wrote about the struggles I was having the first part of this school year. I have been reflecting on the struggles and how I can make a change to ‘better’ myself and my program. What the reflection has ultimately done was cause me to pause and remember why I teach and why I choose to follow the TAB philosophy.

So, I have decided to write a series of posts about TAB and my journey back to myself and back to my “truth”. I will post a link here with each new reading. The first being;

Oh, and in case you were wondering, my word is “Restore”.

“What’s So TAB…?”

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I often see people asking questions along the lines of “What’s so great about TAB?” Sometimes the question is sarcastic. Other times, you can catch the wif of a true curiosity. Someone who really wants to know why so many have made the switch to this philosophy of “asking what it is that artists do”, and of “believing students are the artists and the classroom is their studio”.

This post is for you…all of you. Both the sarcastic, who *think* they don’t want to know, AND the curious, who *know* they want to know.

There are many things that make Teaching For Artistic Behavior (TAB) great. Many of the reasons are common among TAB teachers, but just as each TAB studio is different, each TAB teacher has her/his top reason for it’s greatness.

Let’s get to it.

  • It’s budget friendly. Whether you have a large budget or a almost non-existent one, since you don’t need class sets of everything anymore, it allows for a wider range of materials and tools.
  • It’s a relationship builder. Because each student is working on a more “independent’ style artwork, you can find out more about each student. Because they are adding more of themselves into each artwork, and because you aren’t policing step by step instructions, you can spend more time talking with them.
  • Deeper Thinking and Connections. I’ve found that when I’ve asked my students to plan the artwork, from the beginning, even with a theme, (instead of me designing the whole unit) my students have gone deeper into the meat of their artwork, and the connections between ideas, themselves and their art have increased ten fold.
  • More Exploration. Letting students decide what medium(s) they want to use and how they want to use them is a game changer in creativity. Students are continually asking me, “what if I?” or “what happens when?” it leads to discovery and conversation and wonderfulness.
  • Differentiation. This one is a big one. Because a TAB teacher is not expecting a student’s work to look like an example, and because we are looking at the underlying aspects of art making (the artistic process, choice making, problem solving, skill building, etc.), it is much easier to meet students where they are, and to help them achieve goals that are suited to them, and not everyone else.
  • A Philosophy, not a Curriculum. TAB is a way of thinking about art education. It’s not a curriculum you can buy on TPT. There are no set lesson plans, no explicit rules to be followed. This allows TAB teachers to be flexible in what they teach and how they convey it to students. It allows for campus and district expectations to be met. It allows for a teachers’ level of comfort when it comes to giving up “control” to the students. It gives teachers flexibility when deciding to follow state or national standards. And it allows for more time to focus on the behaviors of artists instead of only exploring every medium that can be fit in during a school year.

It is that last bullet point that is my top reason for what makes TAB so great. TAB has allowed for so many deep, meaningful things to happen with my students. I’ve seen so much growth and connection making since I changed to TAB. Once I realized it wasn’t about me, but about them, and I changed the way I taught to reflect that…

I have never worked harder as a art teacher than I have as a TAB teacher. Yes, physically I did more work when I taught in a more traditional manner, but I wasn’t as happy. Now, the hard work comes mentally–reflecting on what my students need (which changes year to year, and even from semester to semester), reflecting on my teaching practices, reflecting on myself as an artist and a member of my school community, and how I can bring those things into what I am teaching. It’s draining, but so worth it and fulfilling.

If you are a TAB teacher, what is your top reason for why it’s so great? If you are not, what is stopping you from really checking it out?

“Lucky” Number 13?

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This year marks my 13th year as a high school art teacher.  I have spent all 13 years in the same district, at the same school.  I have had 3 principals, 3 superintendents, countless colleagues, and over 1000 students.  Lots of things have changed over the years–some sad, some bad, but mostly good.  I have been lucky to have found a teaching philosophy, TAB, that really resonated with me and kept me from giving up on teaching all together.

Through the years I have seen amazing growth and creativity.  I have watched students eyes get wide as they discovered clay or when they were told they could choose whatever material they wanted.  I couldn’t have asked for a better journey.

As anyone who has gone on a journey knows, it’s not all puppies and rainbows.  And, this year has really demonstrated that for me.  I am having one of the hardest years I have had since my first year teaching.  I’ve had one of the hardest groups of students to come through my program.  I’ve written more referrals in 3 months than I did in 10 years of teaching; and if you know me at all, I’m pretty lax when it comes to discipline.  I just don’t write referrals.  Cell phones drive me up the walls, and kids doing homework in my class instead of arting gives me agita.

But, what really gives me pause this year, is the level of thought being put into the work.  And it’s mostly in my Art 1 classes.  Unfortunately, it isn’t a very deep level of thought.  It’s like they feel thinking is the hardest thing they have ever been asked to do. (Perhaps it is, who knows?) Now, I have always met students where they are in their artistic journey, but this is so different that what I am used to. We’ve normally had to work more on skill and less on concept.  This year it is a lot of column A and a lot a column B.  It has made me question how I am facilitating my TAB studio.  I feel like what I am doing isn’t enough to help them grow during their time in my class.

I have been taking notes and reflecting on years past to see what I can introduce to help them snap out of this lazy thing they call high school.  I know it is in there somewhere.  I know I can find a way to challenge them.  I think it’s a combination of the packets, themes, and explorations.  I’m not 100%, and I have more planning to do.

Seeing the Art of Children

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Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once we grow up.

~Pablo Picasso

This is the ultimate challenge to artists, isn’t it–to hold onto that wild abandon and curiosity when making art.  As we grow up, for some reason that changes.  How we make and view art as adults does a complete 180, and I believe this issue needs to be addressed.  In this day and age as we talk about creativity and how this new generation lacks creativity, we must ask ourselves how did we get here?  Then, we need to figure out how we can change that.

Somewhere along the line, we are taught that the skill to make things realistic is equal to beautiful/good art.  That coloring in the lines is a goal.  That creation comes with a set of directions that needs to be followed.  Things like expression through messiness and exploration through process go to the wayside.  Does this stem from an unconscious connection to the development of fine motor skills (FMS)?  Perhaps somewhere we think that as we develop our FMS, our art should follow suit–that it needs to look sharp and be realistic.  But, I think that is taking away what art could and should be.

The old adage that says “Beauty is in the eye of the beholder” comes to mind.   Art could be defined by this, and many people do define art this way.  But, should it be defined by this?  I think this minimizes what art is.  I think children get it right.  For children, art is about the process.  It’s not defined by skill.  It’s not about correctness.  It’s about telling a story.  It’s about making what is in their head a reality.

And, we as adults need to understand that.  We have been told for so long what to do and how to do it that we have lost track of our inner child.  And, as art teachers, we have an opportunity to help create the next generation of adults who can see art and make art as they did as children.

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Art 1 student in-progress work

You have to be in a state of play to design.

~Paula Scher

That is where Teaching for Artistic Behavior can come into play.  (See what I did there?)  Starting at the elementary level, we can not only teach kids how to behave like artists, but we can teach ourselves and our colleagues to see their, the children’s, work for what they intend it to be.  We can stop telling our students what to create and how to create it, and let them tell us what they want to create and how they want to create it.  Each student has her own story and voice to tell it.  We can stop pushing our adult agenda and aesthetics on students and listen to them.

This doesn’t mean we don’t help our students improve their skill.  This doesn’t mean we don’t teach them about composition or color theory or shading or foreshortening or art history.  Those things are important parts of art, and we should incorporate them into our lessons, but should they be the most important or central part about art?  We need to help guide our students on their journey and see their journey for what it is…and we need to look at it at their level.  We need to meet them where they are.  We need to stop telling them what art should look like, but instead ask them what they envision it could look like.

Perhaps a bullet list will help… And remember, these lists are not mutually exclusive and they are not complete and can change with time


What art doesn’t have to be:

  • photorealistic
  • 24 of the “same” image (ie student created “Van Gogh sunflowers”)
  • polished
  • colored in the lines
  • a finished product

What art could be:

  • made of repurposed materials
  • messy
  • unfinished
  • a “failure”
  • a journey
  • outside the lines
  • unrealistic
  • in need of an explanation

What should be your takeaway from this blog post?  That children’s art is NOT adult art.  AND, we as adults need to recognize that and stop judging it like it is.  Does that sound harsh?  Maybe.  But, what if we did just that and helped to make a generation of artists instead of a generation of followers.

 

 

TAB Institute Part Deux

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About 2 years ago, I was told…not asked, but told that we (we being 4 of us that met and became fast friends at MassArt in Boston at the 2nd TAB institute) were going back in 2019. So, I put that kiln on hold I was starting to save for and instaed saved for my return to Bean Town. Fast forward to January 2019. 2 of us could not make it. I was sad. But, I put on my big girl pants and signed up as soon as registration opened. Andy was still going and so many of my friends were going to be there for faculty…I couldn’t not go. And besides, I had told everyone I was going. Lastly, I really needed some PD that was for me and that I was interested in. Come on art teachers–you know what I mean.

My experience this time was like a complete 180 from my first experience. The first time there was about 40+ attendees compared to 80 this time. Also, the HS section grew from about 4 of us (not including Ian and Clyde) to about 20. Gone were the excursions to Fenway Studios and the local museums. In their places were affinity groups, a mini-conference, ample studio time, and a pop-up art show. I was told we had a studio last time, but I couldn’t tell you where it was.

The week was full. Our time opened with Sunday dinner at The Squealing Pig before going over to the Kennedy to tour the student gallery–photos of work, along with artist statements, from a student carefully chosen by each attendee. Throughout the week, we often met with out grade levels, facilitated by a carefully selected group of amazing TAB teachers–Julie Toole, Clyde Gaw, Roni Rohr, Ian Sands, and Clark Fralick.

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On Wednesday we had a fabulous guest speaker, Ekua Holmes.She was pretty amazing. Her voice was so soothing as she talked about her life and her journey.

Thursday was our mini-conference. Experienced teachers were asked if they wanted to present. This was a great day of teachers teaching each other. I learned a lot about my friend Andy and the connection between being an artist/art teacher. Practice what you preach. I presented on TAB and the single media. I like to share, so here is my slide show. (Just know, TAB teachers like to share openly. We just ask, if you take anything, please credit me. Thanks.)


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On Friday early evening, we had our pop-up art show. It was amazing. I mentioned we had ample studio time this year. We had access to 3 studio rooms, which were set up as the wet room, the dry room, and the sculpture room. Clyde had made 3 very inviting spaces. It seemed every time I went in there 20-30 people were spread out in these rooms creating and sharing. It was a wonderful experience. New techniques were being explored. Art was being created–by many that have a hard time finding the time (unlike I fortunately am able to) to create daily or even weekly. On Friday, the student gallery was taken down, and the pop-up show went in. It was amazing to see what came from the explorations of the week. I loved getting the glimpses into the minds of the teachers I had been working with and learning from all week. I think it was a perfect way to end the week. And, it was a nice way for new to TAB teachers to experience what they will be asking of their students this year.

Learning happened all week long–not just in our classrooms, but in affinity groups at lunch and after dinner. It happened in the studios and through conversations held in the lobby, over breakfast, and in the dorms. It happened as Andy and I headed up the “Drink and Draw” excursions. Drinking isn’t a requirement, but bringing your sketchbook is. We sketched everywhere we went. We even did a 5-minute drawing of the street outside a pizza restaurant near the Paul Revere monument.

Being a veteran TAB teacher along side those who had either just gotten their toes wet in the past year or two and those who were completely new, I wasn’t sure what to expect. I didn’t know what I was going to learn about the philosophy that I wasn’t already aware of, or where I would find places to grow in my practice. I didn’t take many notes this time around. I did talk often though–hopefully Ian wasn’t too sad every time I had something to interject. I do wish there was something more for those of us that consider ourselves further along the journey. But, I’ve felt that way for a while, and I think that is why I focus on other aspects of my art teaching–taking care of me and continuing my arting journey.

What I did discover at the TAB Institute was that I figured out my place on this journey. I am at a place where I need to teach others. I need to keep moving forward and spreading the TAB word and helping to keep true to the philosophy. I need to keep looking at my practice and my population by challenging myself to always do what is best for their learning as they become artists and/or supporters of the arts. I know that seems like something I could have figured out at home without flying all the way across the country. But, I don’t think I would have found the answers I was looking for without being around my tribe. I got to be with old friends and strengthen my relationships with them. I got to make new friends. I got to have invaluable conversations–face to face–that don’t happen the same way on the interwebs. It was through the experience of the “hot as soup” air in Boston that gave me what I was searching for.

Do I recommend the TAB Institute to anyone who is on the TAB spectrum–from TAB curious to TAB Veteran? Absolutely. Would I attend again in 5 years? Oh Ya! You betcha! (said in my best Minnesotan accent.)

The Re-Do: A Final Exam

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It appears as if I am not the only one to have students revisit an artwork made earlier in the year to re-work as a final exam for high school art.  (Melissa Purtee wrote about it here, and I did take the idea from Ian SandsJanine Campbell did it years ago.)

Anyway, for my art 1 and my art 2: p/d classes, the exam was to take a piece of artwork they had made sometime in their class that they created or started to create and re-do it in one of 3 ways–make it better, make it different, or rearrange it.  We looked at a slide show, I answered questions, and then kids had at it.  When they were finished, I had the students fill out a written reflection about the new artwork, why they chose that piece to redo, how they re-did it, and which was stronger/why.  There were a couple of other questions about the work they did this year as well.   The students had to turn in the original (or a photo of the original) with the new work so I could compare.

I thought it was a great way to finish the year.  Students were able to go back over everything they had created.  Some pieces they hadn’t seen since I put them back in their portfolios earlier in the year, some forgetting even having made the piece.  The reasons students gave for choosing specific pieces varied–from it was my favorite piece to I wanted to take it out of my sketchbook to I knew I could do better.   I am so proud of the work they put into the new pieces.  It really was a good way to show what they had learned over the year–art making skills, decision making skills, and reflection skills.  It’s a final exam I will continue to use in my classes.

I wish I had taken more photos, but I was so caught up in what they were doing and the end of the year, that I forgot.

Year 12: A Review

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I have completed my 12th year in eduction, and coincidentally, my 12th year as a

HS Art Teacher at the same school. It’s been an interesting year, to say the least. Many changes began and will continue in our district over the foreseeable future. Some good, some meh, and some make me say blerg.

Anyway, for the most part, things went really well in my TAB studio this year. This was my 6th year as a TAB teacher–I think. Maybe 5th. Who knows, and it isn’t really important how long I’ve taught under the philosophy…just that I believe whole-heartedly in it.

So, without further ado, here is my countdown (as usual) of my favorite moments of the 2018-19 school year.
7. CHANGING RELATIONSHIPS WITH ART: Not one, but two students (that I know of) changed their relationship with art. Both were freshmen this year and both took their required fine art credit this year to get it over with. About a month or so into the year, I over heard one girl telling her friends that she hated art, but because of they way I ran the classroom, she no longer felt that way. She liked the freedom and the faith I put in her. She liked making what she wanted to make. A while later, perhaps after the midterm ( the Tantamounter–old link, but you get the jist), another boy who was only there for the credit and I had over heard several times say he hated art, saw that he wasn’t limited to 2D work, and he came alive. Anytime he could figure out what to build to satisfy the packet umbrella, he would. He couldn’t wait to get started, and would go into the supply room and just dig and create. I am glad to say both signed up to stay with me in ceramics next year.


6. RAKU: Last year I was awarded a grant to purchase a raku kiln for my program. We finally were able to use it this year. It was so much fun. It was a great experience in building the community of my intermediate/advanced ceramics students, and it was such a learning experience for me…I learned a lot about propane. POST

5. ANOTHER GRANT AWARD: This year I applied for another grant, and after much delay, I was finally awarded at $5100 grant to purchase a pugmill for my ceramics program. We have so much dried up clay, and I just can’t wedge it fast enough. (And, due to our schedule and time limits and space, it is not that easy to have the students do it.) My order has been placed; now I am just waiting for it to arrive.


4. T.O.Y. NOMINATION: I was nominated for our Teacher of the Year award. While I didn’t win, I was happy that at least 2 people (you have to be nominated several times to make the final list) thought enough about my teaching and my presence at school to nominate me.
3. PACKETS: This year was the first year I based both my art 1 and beginning ceramics around “The 9“. The packets were developed by Ian Sands, and he let me use them in my classes. I used “The 9” in my art 1 classes and I developed “The 10” for my ceramic classes. I am really happy with how they worked in the classes.

With my art 1 students, we learned some basics about the topic, then the students went through the ATP (Artistic Thinking Process) when interpreting and creating their work. I found they gave the students a place to start with a broad overarching type of artwork, but helped to guide them in how and what they would make. I have some things to tweak for next year in the consideration questions and my input/talking with the students at that stage. But, overall, using them was a major success. I also thing that it will be a smooth transition to art 2 when we dive more into content of their art.

My beginning ceramic students have their own packets. We started with “The 10” before the end of the first semester, and got through 4 or 5. It was a good place to stop and a good place to pick up in intermediate next year. I think it has been helpful in developing style and interests in ceramic art. I think it is harder for many high school students to communicate in 3D than in 2D, so having the different genres of ceramic arts to guide them is important in the journey. I also think it helps to teach the ins and outs of working with clay. We shared and compiled information in different ways as I tried to figure it all out. But, I made lots of notes on how to proceed with The 10 next year in my large group of incoming beginner ceramicists. I am excited for the next group to come in to the studio.
2. SKETCHBOOKS: Every year I change how we are going to do sketchbooks. For the past two years I bought sketchbooks and then had the students buy them from me. This year, I wanted something more. I wanted their sketchbooks to mean something, since I was going to have the kids use them for everything (except drawing tests and artist Mondays). So, instead of purchasing books–either me or them–I decided to have them make coptic stitch sketchbooks. It was a great decision. We did them the first week of school–you know that time when schedules are finalized and kids are coming and going. It was a lot of prep work, but worth it in the end. Most kids took ownership of their books. It was a mostly relaxing way to start off the year, talk about what was needed to be talked about, and to chat with the kids. Most kids took their sketchbooks home at the end of the year.


1. AP STUDIO ART: This year, for whatever reason, my principal had me teach a section of AP Studio Art. We have only had 2D portfolios in the past, and my partner has taught the class(es) since I had started. I was both excited and scared. I found out before the 2017-18 year ended, so I convinced a ceramic student to do the 3D portfolio. She agreed and they created the class for her. My 2D students ended up not doing the portfolio. I knew they wouldn’t. AP was the only 2D class they could sign up for senior year. But, my ceramics girl…she kept going. She worked so hard, and created some of the most developed ceramic pieces that have gone through my program. She completed and submitted her portfolio with a week to spare. I don’t care what scores she gets because the process of doing the portfolio itself changed her and taught her so much. That’s what is really important. I couldn’t be more proud of her.

That about wraps it up. Not everything was good or easy, I did have a student pass away from congestive heart failure. That was hard. And, I had some rocky friendships with colleagues develop this year. But, I can’t dwell on that. I was lucky to have an amazing group of students this year–kids that made me want to be there for them and be a better teacher for them. Overall, it was a good year in the #DuckArt Studio. I wonder what lucky #13 will bring in August.